LSU Cares

lsu-caresLSU Cares is a university initiative dedicated to the well-being of students and promotion of a community that cares about each of its members. The purpose of LSU Cares is to provide an online process for students, faculty, staff, and parents/families to report concerns in an appropriate way.

How do I submit a report?
To submit a report, visit www.lsu.edu/lsucares and look for the category that you think best represents your concern. The categories include academic intervention, academic misconduct, behavioral misconduct, bias or discrimination, hazing, sexual misconduct, student grievances, and students of concern. There is no wrong way to submit a report. The category you select is not as important as the information you share about our Tigers. We will review the information and make sure it gets to the right people.

What happens when I submit a report?
After you submit a report, an LSU Cares representative will contact you as soon as possible to verify that your report was received and gather more information. We then develop a plan and reach out to the student(s) in need.  Reports can be made at any time and can also be anonymous.  It is not unusual for students to make a report about themselves or their peers when they have concerns they do know how to handle.

What qualifies for a student of concern report?
A student of concern report normally deals with students in crisis or distress.  Some examples include loss of a loved one, feeling overwhelmed and not knowing where to turn, and showing a decline in their ability to function as they normally would. Students with concerns like this should all be given the opportunity for a helping hand. Please let us know so we can be proactive in their time of need.

Who sees these reports?
The Associate Dean and Director of Student Advocacy & Accountability receives all the reports and then assigns them to an appropriate advocate within the office.  Reports are reviewed daily. They are kept private and confidential and the information obtained in the report is used only to assist the student.

Emergency issues such as thoughts of harming self or others should be reported immediately to 911.  You can still make a report once the situation has stabilized and the student is safe. We will follow up with your Tiger as soon as possible.

Where can I get more information?
For more information, call the Student Advocacy & Accountability office at 225-578-4307 or send an email to care@lsu.edu.

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Being a First Generation Student

DaMika pic

DaMika Woodard will be serving as the POL for the College of Art and Design. She is a Senior from DeRidder, Louisiana. She is majoring in Kinesiology with a concentration in Pre-Physical Therapy. She is involved in LSU Ambassadors, STRIPES, and Association of Pre-Physical Therapy Students. Her favorite spot on campus is Middleton Library. 

Being a first generation student is a great accomplishment that comes with a lot of pride, and a lot of pressure. I was proud to be the first person in my family to go to a four year university, but I also felt pressured to succeed. Statistically, the odds were not in my favor. It was reported that first generation students are the least likely to graduate from four year universities; I did not want that to be my story. Growing up, I watched my mom bounce from job to job to provide for my siblings and I. My mother always told me things such as: “nothing is ever going to be given to you, you have to work for it. The world is yours, you just have to go and get it!” She constantly stressed the importance of education to us and made sure that we excelled academically. Thanks to her consistency, I graduated from DeRidder High School in 2013 in the top 15 percent of my class, and didn’t stop there! In the Fall of 2013, I began my journey as an LSU Tiger, which was a bittersweet transition for my mother and I. We were excited for this new chapter of my life, but also nervous; this was not only my first taste of college, but hers as well.

My first semester was challenging; not only academically, but in my personal life as well. I had trouble networking with others and keeping my parents up to date on information and events. In addition to those problems, I did not know how to properly study, manage my time, or how to handle my own finances. While trying to juggle it all, I came to the realization that I needed extra help; I could not do this alone. Thankfully, LSU has a service called Student Support Services. At the SSS, their mission is to work directly with first generation students from their freshman orientation to their graduation.

Damika PictureThey have services that teach the students about money management,studying styles, as well as time management. They also offer weekly tutoring sessions and peer mentors, who are first generation students, too. This made things easier because I was surrounded by people who understood me and could give me the extra help that I knew I needed. There are many times that I felt overwhelmed, but my on-campus support system encouraged me to keep going. Now, I am set to graduate in December of 2017 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Kinesiology. In the words of my mother, “The world is yours, you just have to go and get it.”
 

Finding The Major Key To Your Major

 

11011182_10205311904024452_5584625840562960430_nMeet Tori Callais, a Senior majoring in Liberal Arts with a concentration in Women and Gender Studies. She is also minoring is social work and sociology and is from Denham Springs, Louisiana. Tori is involved in LSU Ambassadors, NSCS, Leadership LSU and served as the Orientation Team Leader this past summer.

College is about finding out what you’re passionate about, who you are, who you want to be and finding what makes you excited to learn. Many of those things come from declaring your major once, twice, or maybe a few more times (it happens). Each major is like a different shoe and it’s up to you to find the perfect style and fit for you. Once you find that major that makes you excited to learn and passionate about going to class- it’s a pretty incredible feeling. Sometimes finding it can take years, or maybe if you’re lucky you knew right from the start. But once you find the major that is fit for you and challenges you, how do you react when people shut it down? Or decide that your major and your passions are irrelevant?

There always seems to be this ranking of “important majors” to “less important majors.” You can hear it walking through the Student Union or the library on any given day. “Oh you’re an engineer? You’re going places!” “Oh, you’re majoring in Liberal Arts? Oh…”. Needless to say comments like these help keep this system of “important” majors and “less important” majors in the mindset of many students. But why do we celebrate some majors over others instead of supporting the pursuit of different academic realms? best-memes-boromir

When talking to my best friend the other day about our majors, I noticed that we both have found our niche in college and although our majors aren’t considered money makers in the future, they truly inspire us to learn as much as possible and to continue our academic careers. One thing he said that was upsetting and was something I identified with as well, was how when he told people his major they looked at him with disapproval or even pity. His major of sports administration prompts many questions from friends and family alone of, “what are you going to do with that?” Comments like, “that’s not a real major” from outsiders don’t do much to help one’s confidence on their academic endeavors. Both of our majors will require us to attend graduate school after our undergraduate years, but we both love what we study and going to school a little longer is a plus for us. This conversation I had with him has been repeated in different ways with other friends countless times, and I’m sure other students have had similar conversations as well. So, what do you do if the only people who see the value in your degree are at a limited number?

Tips and tricks for those who have ever been this situation: 

* Be confident in your studies. You chose your degree path for a reason, and it’s important to be confident in that decision. If you aren’t confident in your studies, who else will be?

* Take time to explain why you chose your degree path, and the different places it can take you.

* Don’t be afraid to open up dialogue about your passions. When people see your excitement about your major, they will be able to see the significance of it.

* Encourage others to open up meaningful dialogue with others about what their degree path offers for them.

Although my major does not guarantee a hefty paycheck one day, my academic studies have made me find what I want to pursue after college. I am always excited to go to class because I am learning about something I truly love and want to gain more knowledge on. You’ll never hear me complaining about one of my classes, and I walk with confidence about my degree. Remember that college is a huge and it can be your platform to be the person you want to be. Always stay true to who you are and find your own passion, no matter the title of the degree. And of course, Love Purple and Live Gold!12299110_10205596576741092_4483773923760294457_n

How To Support Your Tiger During Finals!

tcMeet Tori Callais! Tori is a Women and Gender Studies Major with a Social Work and Sociology Minor. She is from Denham Springs Louisiana and will be serving as the 2015 Orientation Team Leader! Tori is also involved with LSU Ambassadors, LSU Women’s Chorale, and NSCS. 

You start to notice your student is drinking an excess of coffee, they begin to take on the smell of caffeine and fear, they have currently set up house in the library, they are beginning to only wear pajamas in public, you see their social media accounts flood with hashtags like #clubmid #finalsprobs #letthecurvebeinmyfavor and you may or may not have heard from them in a couple days…what on earth could this mean? It means it is Finals Week at LSU.

Finals week is the one thing in between a relaxing holiday break and finishing out the semester. As much as the images of endless sleep and countless home cooked meals over break are in every student’s thoughts, they sometime are not enough to take the edge off the “week that must not be named.” So what do you do as a Parent to make sure your student is less stressed throughout this week?

Send positive messages to your students

Hours upon hours of studying tends to lead to some pretty thorough procrastination. Every Facebook page from their best friend in pre-k to their friends in college have been scrutinized and inspected and some throwback pictures have made its way to everyone’s’ newsfeed. With that being said, your student is more or less checking their social media accounts and/or phones frequently to take a break from the daunting task of studying. Leaving a word of encouragement on their Facebook wall or shooting them a meaningful text can help to alleviate some stress from their plates. Seeing positive words can really push a student to keep working hard when the week begins winding down.

Send care packages (through the residential halls/apartments)

Some days can seem like the end of the world during Finals, especially if it is your first college finals week. Walking back to your room in a residential hall and finding that you have a surprise package from a loved one can turn a bad day into a good one in less than a second. LSU Residential Life offers care packages during finals week in order to help family members support their student in midst of their studies. On Residential Life’s website are step by step instructions on how to send a package to their particular hall or apartment on campus (see below for directions). Opening a package full of candy, cards, maybe a stuffed animal or two can help stress levels decrease for a good measure of time. It adds a light to the end of the finals tunnel! 

Send some home cooked food022df06c7f34b7e346e698eabfc76d1e87c2140761c7e4b1623fdc540870265a

My personal favorite that my parents make sure to help me out with during finals is home cooked food. That’s right, I said HOME cooked food. My dad sends me “rations” as we like to say throughout finals so that even while I’m studying day and night, I still have a little piece of home with me to comfort me. They are all in microwavable Tupperware that fit perfectly in my mini fridge, and boy does it come in handy when days seem to last longer than before. The dining halls do an excellent job of preparing top quality food especially during heavy testing periods, but sometimes the smell of my dad’s gumbo is enough to make me forget about that calculus final that is coming up.

Finals week can seem like a lifetime or a blink of an eye, but having loved ones support you in some way throughout the process is a feeling that really does stay with you throughout college. And if your students ever forget to say it, thank each of y’all for constant love and reassurance that we can do this!

Directions to send care packages to your Tiger on Campus in the Residence Halls & Apartments: 

All on-campus residents will be assigned an LSU Box at Ricoh Mail & Printing Services in the LSU Student Union, and the charge is posted on the student fee bill.

To claim a box and key, visit Ricoh in room 101 in the LSU Student Union. This box will be able to receive both regular mail and packages. The student’s name and mailbox number must be on all mail and packages. Students will receive a pick up notification via e-mail when a package arrives and should bring a picture ID to claim packages.

To send mail and packages to an LSU Box, please follow this address format:
Student’s Name
101 LSU Student Union Bldg.

LSU Box # _ _ _ _ Baton Rouge, LA 70803

Residential communities will accept deliveries (from local businesses only) of fresh cut flowers, cut fruit bouquets, or cookie bouquets. For the safety and security of residents, the residential front desk staff is unable to verify, identify, or disseminate the contact information (including phone numbers) of specific residents. If the delivery agency requires a signature or direct contact with the receiving resident, the aforementioned student’s phone number must have already been provided with the order by the ordering party. After receiving delivery, the front desk worker will notify the resident through their LSU e-mail account that they have a package to pick up at the front desk. The Department of Residential Life is not responsible for lost packages.

Use the following address format when receiving perishables (ONLY those mentioned above):

Student’s name
Room number and building name

Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA 70803

You can also view this link and check out page 22 for info on mail delivery! http://sites01.lsu.edu/wp/reslife/files/2013/06/LivingOnCampusHandbook.pdf