LSU Cares

lsu-caresLSU Cares is a university initiative dedicated to the well-being of students and promotion of a community that cares about each of its members. The purpose of LSU Cares is to provide an online process for students, faculty, staff, and parents/families to report concerns in an appropriate way.

How do I submit a report?
To submit a report, visit www.lsu.edu/lsucares and look for the category that you think best represents your concern. The categories include academic intervention, academic misconduct, behavioral misconduct, bias or discrimination, hazing, sexual misconduct, student grievances, and students of concern. There is no wrong way to submit a report. The category you select is not as important as the information you share about our Tigers. We will review the information and make sure it gets to the right people.

What happens when I submit a report?
After you submit a report, an LSU Cares representative will contact you as soon as possible to verify that your report was received and gather more information. We then develop a plan and reach out to the student(s) in need.  Reports can be made at any time and can also be anonymous.  It is not unusual for students to make a report about themselves or their peers when they have concerns they do know how to handle.

What qualifies for a student of concern report?
A student of concern report normally deals with students in crisis or distress.  Some examples include loss of a loved one, feeling overwhelmed and not knowing where to turn, and showing a decline in their ability to function as they normally would. Students with concerns like this should all be given the opportunity for a helping hand. Please let us know so we can be proactive in their time of need.

Who sees these reports?
The Associate Dean and Director of Student Advocacy & Accountability receives all the reports and then assigns them to an appropriate advocate within the office.  Reports are reviewed daily. They are kept private and confidential and the information obtained in the report is used only to assist the student.

Emergency issues such as thoughts of harming self or others should be reported immediately to 911.  You can still make a report once the situation has stabilized and the student is safe. We will follow up with your Tiger as soon as possible.

Where can I get more information?
For more information, call the Student Advocacy & Accountability office at 225-578-4307 or send an email to care@lsu.edu.

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New Year, New Semester, Fresh Start

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Lexi is first-year graduate student at LSU, pursuing an MBA with a specialization in marketing analytics. She currently serves as the marketing & communication graduate assistant at LSU First Year Experience (FYE). Before pursuing her master’s degree, Lexi received her bachelor’s degree in mass communication: public relations from LSU. She is from the small town of Lockport, LA, but has enjoyed living in Baton Rouge for the past five years.  

With a new year, comes a new semester and a fresh start at tackling classes and all of the exciting, yet occasionally stressful, things that come with any college experience. The best way to kick off a new semester is to take the time to reflect on the one that just passed. The very first thing all Tigers should think is: “Wow! I conquered another (or your first) semester toward a long-term goal I’ve set for myself!” This past fall semester was a rough start for everyone at LSU, and having made it through is a huge accomplishment that all Tigers should celebrate. After considering all that you’ve accomplished in the past semester, you should begin to think about things you can improve upon. Ask yourself, “How can I make the spring semester even better? How can I finish this year off strong?” As a Tiger with years of experience of balancing course work, student leadership and involvement, internships and work, as well as a social life; here’s the advice I would give any student on starting the semester off strong:

  1. Be proactive, not reactive! Plan ahead, Tigers! The best way to ensure that you start off the semester on the right foot, is to know what you want to accomplish. Set goals for yourself now, before the semester starts. While it sounds like a minor thing, starting classes with clear-cut goals of what you want to accomplish will take a massive amount of stress off of you during the first weeks of classes. I am a visual person, so the way that I set my goals is by writing down what I want to work toward, and even writing down how I am going to do it. This helps me stay focused, even when other things pop up.
  2. Tackle Homesickness. During my first few years at LSU, coming back to campus after the month-long break was tough because I would get used to being with my family and hometown friends again. While the saying, “There’s no place like home,” is absolutely true, the only way to make the feeling of homesickness subside is to make LSU your home. The best way to do this is to get involved and take advantage of the resources and events that the University offers. You should take comfort in the fact that your becoming the person you’ve always wanted to be, and you’re accomplishing a major goal by being here.
  3. Stick to the rule of three! I am a big believer that the more involved you are, the better you do in school. With that being said, I also believe that you cannot give a thousand things 100 percent of your ability all at the same time. So my advice is to stop doing several things half-way and do three things extremely well. For example, during my senior year of my undergraduate time at LSU my three things were doing well in school, serving as vice president of PRSSA at LSU and my job at LSU FYE. When you focus all of your effort on only a few specialized things, you’d be amazed at all you can accomplish and how well-received your work will be amongst your superiors and teachers. My advice for how to narrow down to only three things is to stick with what is going to help you accomplish the goals you’ve set (See #1).
  4. Know what helps you de-stress! Sometimes no matter how much you plan in advance, the stress of the semester still sneaks up on you. When this happens, it is good to know what is going to make you feel better and gain a handle on things. For me, depending on how stressed I was at the time, it could be as simple as taking a few deep breaths and watching my favorite TV show or even going for a run regularly. Everyone is different, but it will be helpful to have a healthy way to de-stress in mind when that overwhelming feeling sneaks up on you. LSU’s Center for Academic Success has great examples of ways to manage stress, and the LSU UREC has a lot of active ways to decompress.
  5. Don’t be afraid to ask for help! I would be willing to bet that there are very few, if any, successful people out there who achieved their success without the help and guidance of others. That is why it is important to know your limits, and know when you may need help from a classmate or a tutor, or when you may need to take advantage of the additional resources on campus. Asking for help will never hinder you from reaching a goal, but giving up surely will.
  6. Know that you can do it! You’ve already made it through one semester this year, so there is no doubt you’ll make it through this one! You can accomplish all of the goals you set by staying focused, organized and working hard. Good luck this semester, Tigers! Even though you won’t need it because I know you’ve got this semester covered.

Freshman Survival Guide: Changing Majors

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Chandler Wall will be serving as the POL for Music and Dramatic Arts and the College of Agriculture. He is a Junior from Dallas, Texas. He is a Human Resources and Education major with a concentration in Leadership. He is involved with LSU Ambassadors and his favorite spot on campus is Mike’s Habitat. 

Changing your major is quite common to the average college student. I personally have changed my major a total of 4 times now and almost every time I had to change my senior college. I would think that this next one would be the major I graduate with, but each time I would realize that it wasn’t for me.  After I realized that my third major change wasn’t what I hoped it would be, I decided that it was time for me to change again. Except this time was different, this time I felt lost. This time I wasn’t changing my major because I found something I felt I liked better.

Chandler BlogI didn’t know what I wanted anymore, or what the best fit for me was. I just knew that I wasn’t happy in that major anymore. It was a terrifying feeling. I had just finished my sophomore year of college, now half way through my college career and I no longer knew what I wanted to do. I went and talked to my friends about what I should do next and they all said the same thing, “Pay a visit to the Olinde Career Center.” I had heard about it in the past but had never been there myself. I didn’t realize that I walked by it almost everyday in the Student Union. I wasn’t sure if it would be able to solve all my problems, but I knew that it was definitely worth a try.

When the new school year was starting I walked in and set up an appointment with a career counselor. She sat me down and we talked for a long while until she had a grasp on my situation. From there we started from scratch, we looked at many different majors offered by each college at LSU. She could tell that our conversation wasn’t getting me any closer to figuring out what I wanted to do. She then proposed that I take on online test known as the Strong Test. This test would help to tell me what kind of work style I had, what jobs would really suit me, which jobs wouldn’t, it even told me whaChandler Blog 3t majors I would work well in. So I went and took the test and I would meet back with her once the results came in.

About a week later, I went to meet her again to look at my results. I was surprised to see my test results were a stack of papers half an inch thick. They were telling me things about myself that I never realized and options that I had never even considered. We talked until I could narrow it down to three majors. Then I went and spoke to each senior college to weigh my options. Eventually I choose to go with Human Resources and Education. Words couldn’t describe the feeling of relief I had now that I had a major and a plan again. Sometimes people realize that they actual don’t want to major in what they came to college to study and that is okay. It’s better to realize this early during your undergrad, instead of a week before graduation or even after. The LSU Olinde Career Center is there for this specific purpose and it should definitely be utilized, because it definitely can’t hurt.

How To: GEAUX Find a Job!

UntitledMeet Morgan Decuir, a current senior at LSU majoring in Elementary Education. She loves serving her university as a member of LSU Ambassadors, and she is also one of the founding members and President of Associated Professional Educators of Louisiana (A+PEL). Throughout her years at LSU, she served as the 2014 POL for the College of Human Sciences and Education, served on the SPRINGFEST Executive Board as the Associate Chair for Events and Training, is a member of Kappa Delta Epsilon, and served on the Student Support Service’s Student Activities Board as the Communications Liaison. Morgan is more than thrilled to begin her career as a teacher in Fall 2015.

It’s the beginning of senior year and I have everything planned out: some lesson plans that can be altered for grade levels, a small portfolio that features some of my previous students’ work, and even a some-what completed resume. I thought I was prepared for it all, until the same question was asked by everyone I came to contact with, “Where do you want to teach next year?”…Wait, what? I did not even begin classes yet and I have to think about where I want to begin my teaching career? It did not hit me that I will have my very own classroom in less than 10 months! This is where I began to have slight panic attacks every other night. I told myself, “Morgan, you will have a position waiting for you before you walk across the stage at graduation.” Then I began to ask myself, “Where do I even begin?”

After a month or so of small panic attacks about my life, I received an e-mail from the LSU Olinde Career Center. This e-mail was specialized for all College of Human Sciences and Education students to give us an update of services and events that can help us for our future careers. Mine looked like this:

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Each student receives their own e-mail from the LSU Olinde Career Center that is specialized for their college. Since the College of HSE encompasses many career options, students are able to take a look at other events that are occurring as well. Although I am an Elementary Education major, it didn’t hurt that I looked into the section about Careers in Student Affairs Month. I’ve thought about doing other career options in the far future with my degree in Elementary Education. However, my main focus in this e-mail was Teacher Interviewing Day.

Teacher Interviewing Day (TID) is an event where representatives from many school districts all over different states come on campus to interview aspiring teachers. Since I am a senior and I had my plan of landing a position before graduation, I made an effort to be there. From that moment, I fixed my resume to the best of my ability and uploaded it on Careers2Geaux—another amazing resource that LSU offers to all undergraduate students for free. The week before TID, I found out that I could not attend because I had to teach that day. Discouraged, I took my mind off of TID and continued to focus on lesson planning. I put off going to the LSU Olinde Career Center for assistance in perfecting my resume because I knew I wasn’t going to be able to make it to TID. But then on the Monday evening week of TID, I get an e-mail stating that I had a request to be interviewed. I was super excited! I knew that I could not turn an interview down, especially when the employer asked me.

On the day of TID, I taught my math and science lesson, and right after I zoomed to LSU to prepare. I walked in so nervous, but more excited that I was asked to be here for an interview. The interview went AMAZING and I was given the opportunity to tour the location over Winter Break and begin filling out the application for the upcoming 2015-2016 school year to have a position waiting for me—my dream was turning into a reality!

My experience with TID was possible through the LSU Olinde Career Center. Encourage your student to stop by their offices and utilize all of the resources available. From resume building, interview tips, and even renting an outfit for interview day, the LSU Olinde Career Center makes sure that your student is prepared to excel at any interview and land their perfect position. By the time your student is a senior, it will be super easy for them to geaux find a job!

LSU Cale P. Smith Student Financial Management Center

Today’s post comes from Raylea Barrow, a Graduate Assistant for the Student Financial Management Center. Read more to learn what the Student Financial Management Center is all about!

The LSU Cale P. Smith Student Financial Management Center is thrilled for our brand new location in the LSU Olinde Career Center of the LSU Student Union! This facility will further allow us to engage students in financial literacy education and advise students to become financially responsible. Financial literacy education plays an important role in teaching students how to properly create and maintain a budget, form disciplined spending habits and set financial goals. Students will gain access to these lessons through our personal one-on-one advising, First Year Finance programming and any additional campus activities related to our office. The LSU SFMC also offers Transit, a free online course requirement which first year students can use to test their financial knowledge through mock scenarios.

Students and famalies interested in the LSU SFMC can continue financial education by accessing our online resources at sfmc.lsu.edu or our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/lsusfmc. Emily Burris Hester serves as coordinator for the office and her associate, Raylea Barrow, serves as the current graduate assistant. Our office, 158BB Student Union, has appointments available on weekdays between 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

This Thursday, September 18th, the Student Financial Management Center will be holding their first event of the year. Encourage your student to geaux check it out at Free Speech Alley!

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Location: 158 BB LSU Student Union

Email: sfmc@lsu.edu

Phone: (225)-578-1586